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What are Stem Cells?
A mesenchymal stem cell is a primitive cell with the ability to:
Cell
cell
What are Stem Cells?
A mesenchymal stem cell is a primitive cell with the ability to:
  • Self-Replicate
  • Differentiate into
    multiple tissues
  • Bone
  • Cartilage
  • Muscle
  • Fat
  • Fight Apoptosis
    (Cell Death)
  • Reduce Inflammation

News Updates

Groundbreaking stem cell study kicks off in Northwest Florida
Source:
Weartv

A new study taking place at the Andrews Institute in Northwest Florida could shape the future of orthopedic surgery. The goal of the study, spearheaded by Dr. Adam Anz and already eight years in the making, is to use stem cells to regrow cartilage.

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GARM Now Offering Elite Athletes Stem Cell Treatment with US Olympic Orthopedic Surgeon
Source:
PRWeb

Global Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, known as GARM, is now offering stem cell therapy for elite athletes with US Olympics doctor Glenn Terry MD. The treatments are being offered in the Caribbean with extremely high cell counts for the highest effectiveness. Call (877) 737-0441 for more information and scheduling.

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Experimental Stem Cell Therapy Could Treat Damaged Knee Cartilage
Source:
BU News Service

Skiing in Aspen, Sean Fair mistimed a landing and felt a shooting pain in his right knee as he crumpled into the snow. He had to slide down the steep slope on his left ski. The doctor revealed that Fair’s agony originated from a quarter-sized hole in the cartilage of his knee.

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Electroacupuncture releases stem cells to relieve pain, promote tissue repair, study finds
Source:
Science Daily

A new study demonstrates how electroacupuncture triggers a neurological mechanism that can help promote tissue repair and relieve injury-induced pain. The findings provide the most comprehensive picture yet of how electroacupuncture stimulates the brain to facilitate the release of stem cells and adds new insight relating to the cells’ healing properties.

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Regenerative Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Source:
Healthline

A stem cell-based medication has done well in phase II trials. There’s hope it can be a future drug for people with RA.

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Stem cell procedure could be next wave in sports medicine
Source:
Boston Globe

With a painful shot in October that left him unable to bend his prized arm for days, Red Sox lefthander Drew Pomeranz joined what he and others hope is a transformative development in sports medicine.

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New Treatment Helps Young Arthritis Patients

Source: CBS Boston

Arthritis is usually thought to affect older people, but young adults can suffer from it, too. Dr. Mallika Marshall moderated a panel Thursday at Brigham and Women’s Hospital on regenerative medicine, specifically looking at innovative ways to treat young patients with arthritis. One such treatment uses stems cells harvested from umbilical cords.

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New orthopedic procedures can stem the tide of surgical needs

Source: Gulf Coast News Today

There was a time when, for those dealing with a sports injury or arthritic pain, their only option was an invasive surgical procedure with an often painful recovery. For many, surgery is still the only option, but for others, replacement therapies such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate (BMA) are becoming increasingly common.

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Pioneering stem-cell therapy can eliminate back pain

Source: NJ.com

Across the United States, the number of neck and back pain sufferers is increasing, steadily pushing doctors to identify out-of-the-box solutions to treat spine conditions that don’t require surgery. In recent years, one of the most predominant breakthroughs within the orthopedic industry is a nonsurgical treatment called stem cell therapy.

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Want to avoid surgery for joint pain? Pro athletes, others try PRP and stem cell injections

Source: The Charlotte Observer

In Charlotte, a few orthopedic practitioners, who offered PRP even before that Steelers moment, have been low-key about it, careful not to over-promise on results. But in the past year and a half, PRP – and a newer injection therapy using stem cells – have taken on a higher profile in Charlotte.

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Shoulder activity not associated with severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tear
Source:
Healio

Among patients with atraumatic rotator cuff tears, shoulder activity was not associated with severity of the tear, but was affected by patients’ age, sex and occupation, according to study results.

Researchers prospectively enrolled patients with an atraumatic rotator cuff tear on MRI in the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network shoulder study of nonoperative treatment. Patients were asked to complete a previously validated shoulder activity scale; 434 patients completed the scale and were included in the analysis. Mean patient age was 62.7 years.

The researchers performed a regression analysis to assess the association of shoulder activity level to rotator cuff tear characteristics, including tendon involvement and traction, as well as patient factors such as age, sex, smoking and occupation.

Shoulder activity was not associated with severity of the rotator cuff tear, according to the researchers. However, shoulder activity was negatively associated with age and female sex. According to the regression model, 69-year-old patients with rotator cuff tears were 1.5 points less active on the 20-point scale vs. identical 56-year-old patients; female patients were 1.6 points less active vs. similar male patients. Occupation was also a significant predictor of shoulder activity level, with unemployed patients predicted to be 4.8 points less active compared with employed patients.

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Extended capsular release unnecessary for shoulder stiffness in arthroscopic surgery
Source:
Healio

Although arthroscopic capsular release is a known treatment for shoulder stiffness, posterior extended capsular release might not be necessary in arthroscopic surgery, according to study results.

Researchers enrolled 75 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for shoulder stiffness. The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: those in whom capsular release, including release of the rotator interval and anterior and inferior capsule, was performed (n = 37), and those in whom capsular release was extended to the posterior capsule (n = 38).

The researchers used American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, Simple Shoulder Test, VAS pain scores and range of motion (ROM) for evaluation before surgery, at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and at the last follow-up. Mean follow-up was 18.4 months.

ROM increased significantly among both groups at the last follow-up compared with preoperative scores (P < .05). However, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, Simple Shoulder Test and VAS pain scores at the last follow-up (P > .05), according to the researchers.

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Anatomic features not tied to pain in rotator cuff tears
Source:
MedicalXpress

Anatomic features associated with the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with pain level, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Obesity may be driving increasing need for knee and hip replacements in steadily younger patients
Source:
dailyRx

The impact of being overweight has far reaching health implications — implications that may be taking a toll at an earlier age.

In a new study, researchers found that packing on the pounds may be setting the stage for total knee or hip replacement at increasingly younger ages.

Further, the scientists found that being overweight or obese had a greater impact on the knee than the hip.

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NFL players return to the game after stabilizing shoulder surgery
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Shoulder instability is a common injury in football players but the rate of return to play has not been regularly determined following surgery. A new study, discussed at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting, details that return rates for NFL players is approximately 90 percent no matter what the stabilization procedure (open vs. arthroscopic).

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Risk factors identified for little league shoulder
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

As cases of Little League Shoulder (LLS) occur more frequently, the need for additional information about the causes and outcomes of the condition has become clear. Researchers presenting at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting shared new data identifying associated risk factors, common treatment options and return to play.

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High success rates seen for combined meniscal, ACL repair
Source:
Healio

Concurrent meniscal and ACL repair has shown high rates of success, according to a presenter here.

Researchers evaluated 235 patients from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) who underwent both unilateral primary ACL reconstructions and concurrent meniscal repair between 2002 and 2004. Of the meniscal repairs, 154 were medial, 72 were lateral and nine underwent both.

Validated patient-oriented outcome data (KOOS, WOMAC) scores, Marx activity scores and IKDC scores were recorded at 2 and 6 years follow-up. Failure of meniscal repairs was determined by subsequent ipsilateral repair.

“This represents the largest cohort combining meniscus repair and ACL reconstruction follow-up for a minimum of 6 years,” Robert W. Westermann, MD, said during the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Overall, 86% of meniscal repairs were successful at 6-year follow-up; of these, 86.4% were medial meniscal repair, 86.1% were lateral meniscal repairs and 77.8% were in cases where both were repaired, according to Westermann.

Of the 33 repair failures, nine (27.3%) were related to revision ACL surgery. On average, medial meniscal repairs failed sooner than lateral repairs (2.1 years vs. 3.7 years).

KOOS Symptoms, KOOS Pain, KOOS KRQOL, WOMAC Pain, and IKDC values all improved significantly when comparing baseline scores to 6-year follow-up, according to Westermann. Marx Activity levels gradually declined from time of injury to 6-year follow-up. — by Christian Ingram

Reference:
Westermann RW. Paper #44.Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 10-13, 2014; Seattle.

Disclosure:Westermann has no relevant financial disclosures.

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Autografts may improve ACL reconstructions
Source:
Medical News Today

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructions occur more than 200,000 times a year, but the type of material used to create a new ligament may determine how long you stay in the game, say researchers who presented their work at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine (AOSSM).

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Exercise intensity often overestimated
Source:
Medical News Today

Do you work out for health benefits and feel you are exercising more than enough? You might be among the many Canadians who overrate how hard they work out or underestimate what moderate intensity exercise means, according to a recent study out of York University’s Faculty of Health.

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Identifying risk factors for ACL re-injury
Source:
Medical News Today

Re-tearing a repaired knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) happens all too frequently, however a recent study being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting suggests that identification and patient education regarding modifiable risk factors may minimize the chance of a future ACL tear.

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Partial knee replacement safer than total knee replacement
Source:
Medical News Today

Partial knee replacement surgery is safer than total knee replacement according to a new study published in The Lancet.

Patients who had a partial knee replacement are 40 per cent more likely to have a re-operation, known as revision surgery, during the first eight years after the replacement, than those that had a total knee replacement.

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New approach to total knee replacement spares muscle, decreases pain
Source:
The Daily Progress

Total knee arthroplasty, also known as total knee replacement, is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, as of 2010, more than600,000 total knee replacements were being performed annually in the United States. The number of total knee replacements performed annually in the U.S. is expected to grow by 673 percent to 3.48 million procedures by 2030.

To start, a rigorous preoperative optimization process is now in place to help minimize the risk of complications after surgery. Patients also attend a joint education class to be advised of what to expect before, during and after the surgery. Studies have shown that these educational classes improve patient outcomes.

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ACL injury risk reduced in young athletes by universal neuromuscular training
Source:
Medical News Today

The ACL is a critical ligament that stabilizes the knee joint. An ACL injury, one of the most common sports injuries, often requires surgery and a lengthy period of rehabilitation before an athlete can return to sport and other activities. Recent research has found that screening tools, such as “hop” or isokinetic (computer/video) tests to identify neuromuscular deficits, as well as neuromuscular training programs, may reduce ACL injuries.

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Positive results for meniscal allograft transplantation surgery for young athletes with knee pain
Source:
Medical News Today

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) surgery require an additional operation approximately 32% of the time, but overall see a 95% success rate after an average five-year follow-up, according to new research released at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Sport makes muscles and nerves fit
Source:
Medical News Today

Endurance sport does not only change the condition and fitness of muscles but also simultaneously improves the neuronal connections to the muscle fibers based on a muscle-induced feedback. This link has been discovered by a research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. The group was also able to induce the same effect through raising the protein concentration of PGC1α in the muscle.

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Baseball pitchers, volleyball spikers have something in common: Similar shoulder, elbow injuries
Source:
Science Daily

Baseball and volleyball players share the similar arm injuries due to overuse of their shoulders and elbows. In both circumstances, the shoulder muscles generate and transmit an incredible amount of energy and serve as the transition point where built up energy is transferred from the rest of the body down the arm. After too many pitches or serves, these shoulder muscles get overworked and tend to cause the shoulder to tighten up.

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Short term improvements only for shoulder revision repair surgery
Source:
Medical News Today

Long-term outcomes of revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery is not as successful as in a first-time surgery, according to researchers from the Orthopaedic Research Institute in Sydney, Australia, who presented their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Rotator Cuff Repair and Immobilization
Source:
Methodist Orthopedics

Shoulder rotator cuff repair aims to suture torn rotator cuff tendons and provide them with the optimal environment to heal and minimize chance of retear. Overall retear rates have decreased over the years, but are still a major concern. Better suture techniques have been thoroughly investigated but there is less attention paid to the rehabilitation protocol. Currently the gold standard for rehabilitation after surgery is to wear an abduction brace and begin physical therapy for passive range of motion within the first few weeks. As surgical techniques have evolved from open surgery to arthroscopic surgery, there are questions as to whether this rehabilitation protocol is ideal. Animal studies have shown that longer periods of immobilization are beneficial to healing after rotator cuff repair.

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Collagen for the knee: Gel-like implant invented
Source:
Science Daily

Millions of people suffer cartilage damage to the knee every year. Cartilage injuries are not only painful; they can lead to osteoarthritis decades later. In the course of the disease, the protective shock absorbing cartilage that covers the bone within the joint slowly is removed until the bone is finally exposed, typically requiring an artificial joint replacement. A biotechnology company has developed a one-step minimally-invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cartilage defects: a gel-like implant.

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FDA approves Eliquis® (apixaban) to reduce the risk of blood clots following hip or knee replacement surgery
Source:
Medical News Today

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Pfizer Inc. has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Eliquis (apixaban) for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery.

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  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  •  American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
  • International Society for Hip Arthroscopy
  • Arthroscopy Association of North America – AANA
  • RYC Orthopaedics
  • Pro Medical New York